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Contents

Tick Chart vs. One-Minute Chart for Day Trading

The Pros and Cons of Tick and Time-Based Charts

Getty Images/Witthaya Prasongsin

Both tick charts and times are essential for traders to understand and the trader may find the use of one chart over the other better suits their trading style. Tick charts create a new bar following a tick—the pervious set number of trades—either up or down. Time charts use the basis of a specific timeframe and can be configured for many different periods. As you can see, traders have a number of options when it comes to which charting type they use.

Chart Basics

Candlesticks and bar charts are the most popular chart used by many traders. Both the candlestick and the bar can provide the trader with the same information. The one primary difference is that candlestick charts are color-coded and easier to see.

When using these two types of charts traders can choose to create price bars based on time or ticks. Time and tick charts have benefits and disadvantages for the trader. Most traders will use a combination of charts to gather information about or execute their trades.

One-Minute or Time-Based Chart

Time charts can be set for many different time frames. However, if you are using the chart for active trading you will probably want to focus on short periods. If you use a one-minute, two-minute, or five-minute chart, then a new price bar forms when the time period elapses. On a one-minute chart, a new bar forms every minute, showing the high, low, open, and close for that one-minute period.

This creates a uniform x-axis on the price chart because all price bars are evenly spaced over time. Sixty price bars are produced each hour, assuming at least one transaction took place in the stock or asset you are following. One-minute charts are popular among day traders but aren’t the only option.

Tick Chart

The bars on a tick chart are created based on a particular number of transactions. For example, a 512-tick chart creates a new bar after every 512 transactions. You can customize tick charts to the number of transactions you want, for example, 5 ticks or 1546 ticks.

Throughout the day there are active and slower times, where many or few transactions occur. Therefore, the x-axis typically isn’t uniform with ticks charts. When a market opens there is quite a bit of volatility and action. So, the tick bars occur very quickly. Five ticks bars may form in the first minute alone. During the lunch hour, though, when the number of transactions decreases, it may take five minutes before a single tick bar is created.

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The Power of the Tick Chart

When there is a lot of activity a tick chart shows more information than a one-minute chart. This information includes more price waves, consolidations, and smaller-scale price moves.

For example, when a market opens several ticks bars within the first minute or two may show multiple price swings that can be used for trading purposes. If using a one-minute chart only one bar forms in the first minute, and two bars after two minutes.

These one or two bars may not present the same trading opportunities as the several tick bars that occurred over the same time frame. In this way, tick charts allow you to get into moves sooner, take more trades, and spot potential reversals before they occur on the one-minute chart.

The Power of the One-Minute Chart

When there are few transactions going through, a one-minute chart appears to show more information. For example, assume you are debating using a 90 tick chart or a one-minute chart. Assume that during the lunch hour only 10 transactions occur each minute. It will take nine minutes for a tick bar to complete and for a new one to start.

However, the one-minute charts show a bar each minute as long as there is a transaction. In this case, the one-minute chart produces nine times as many bars as the tick chart, showing more price waves, trends, and support and resistance levels that could potentially be traded.

The Illusion of a Trade or a Real Trade

Tick charts “adapt” to the market. Fewer bars form when there are fewer transactions, warning a trader that activity levels are low or dropping. The one-minute chart, on the other hand, continues to produce price bars every minute as long as there is one transaction within that minute timeframe. This may create the illusion of activity, even though there may actually be little volume in the stock, futures contract, or forex pair.

An Example

A chart from TD Ameritrade of the intraday Spdr S&P 500 ETF (SPY) is an excellent example of the difference between using a tick or time chart to trade. Here, the white, time chart lags behind the low notification of the darker, tick chart. The one-minute chart is compared to a 1000 tick chart of the SPY. Both charts start and end at 9 a.m. and 4:02 p.m., respectively. The one-minute chart provides more price bars before 9:30 a.m., but the tick chart creates more price bars during the day—when there is a higher number of transactions—essentially creating a higher “resolution” view of price moves.

One chart type isn’t necessarily better than another. Both can be traded effectively using the right day trading strategy, but traders should be aware of both types so they can determine which works better for their trading style.

Tick Charts: 5 Compelling Reasons to Use Tick Charts

Updated: Sunday 15 March 2020

Tick Charts are one of my “secret weapons” and this article explains why.

Tick Charts are not very well known and can be confusing. From time to time I get questions about Tick Charts and yesterday’s email from Ken was typical:

I’ve been scouring the Internet for information on tick charts and their ins and outs – but have found nothing useful. Can you please point me to a good source of information with a decent explanation? Ken

Well I consider myself a little bit of an expert on Tick Charts, so here goes. Use the links below to jump to a particular section:

What is a Tick Chart?

A Tick Chart draws a new bar after a set number of trades, for example after every 500 trades. Conventional (i.e. time-based) charts draw a new bar after a set period of time, for example after every 5 minutes.

Don’t get confused with the NYSE TICK Index (or $TICK in many charting programs). The NYSE TICK Index is a totally different thing. It measures the number of stock issues trading on an uptick versus a downtick. A Tick, by contrast, is just a trade and 1 Tick = 1 trade.

I much prefer Tick Charts over conventional, time-based charts. Here are my 5 reasons why.

5 Advantages of Tick Charts

#1 Tick Charts allow you to follow the Professionals

The Emini is a perfect trading vehicle because we know the number of contracts in each individual trade. So on a Tick Chart when we plot volume we see the total number of contracts traded during those last say 100 trades. The relative size of the volume histogram shows us the average trade size. Let’s take an example.

If during the last 100 trades the average number of contracts in each individual trade was 2, the volume histogram would show a value of 200. However, if during the last 100 trades the average number of contracts in each individual trade was 25, then the volume histogram would show a value of 2,500. So if the volume histogram is low we are seeing Amateurs trading and if the volume histogram is high we are seeing Professionals.

The 2,097 Tick Chart above has some of the high value bars highlighted – these show large average trade sizes or Professionals. As you can see, you want to follow the Professionals. They were buying the dips and shorting the rallies.

#2 Tick Charts allow you to fade the Amateurs

Similarly, looking out for low value bars allows you to identify what the Amateurs are doing. The 2,097 Tick Chart above is exactly the same as the previous chart but with some of the low value bars highlighted. These show small average trade sizes or Amateurs. As you can see, you want to fade (i.e. do the opposite of) the Amateurs. They were shorting the dips and buying late into the rallies.

Now I think that information alone would be reason enough to use Tick Charts, but there’s more …

#3 Tick Charts let you get a jump on breakouts

If you’re waiting for the close of a bar to enter a trade, say a breakout, a Tick Chart will get you in earlier. The Emini trading chart above illustrates the point. The Emini spiked up on FOMC-related news. Using a Tick Chart you could see the surge in activity and enter at the bar’s close – say 779. With say a 3 minute chart the entry on close would have got you in closer to 784 – or 5 points worse off!

Hi Barry, I used to use 1 min, 5 min, 15 min charts etc. but found time to be inadequate due to changes in volatility. I would be profitable for 2 months and then boom, volatility spikes up and all of sudden, my trading is not good. Switching to 1500 tick and 4500 tick has completely masked the volatility differences and allows me to trade more consistently regardless of the volatility. John G.

#4 Tick Charts let you “see” more cyclical information

A Tick Chart will also allow you to “see” more trade information and work particularly well with cycle analysis. In the example above, the Better Sine Wave, my preferred cycle analysis tool, was able to pick out a Pull Back long entry point in the 2,097 Tick Chart. However, with the 3 minute chart the Pull Back was completely missed.

#5 Tick Charts compress low activity periods

Lastly, a Tick Chart compresses low activity periods, like lunch time, after-hours and overnight trading. This reduces whipsaws and allows more “continuous” analysis between days, with trades setting-up pre-open on a Tick Chart. Or fewer false break-out trades during lunch time.

What Tick Chart settings to use

Best Tick Chart for Emini day trading

The three best Tick Charts for Emini day trading are the 500 Tick, 1,500 Tick and 4,500 Tick Charts. I use these in my multiple time frame (MTF) analysis of the Emini. The lowest timeframe (500 Tick) is great for timing an entry or exit. The intermediate timeframe (1,500 Tick) is great for identifying the trend direction. And the highest timeframe (4,500 Tick) allows you to see the big picture.

Over the years the CME has made various changes to their Globex data feed. And this has created some anxiety for traders and also forced me to change my Emini day trading chart setup.

Prior to October 2009, the Emini charts I used were 233 Tick, 699 Tick and 2,097 Tick. 233 is a Fibonacci number and that’s why it was my starting point. But then with the CME changes in October 2009, I switched to the current chart settings of 500, 1,500 and 4,500 Tick. You can read more about the 2009 CME changes here.

Then in 2020 the CME made even more changes – an update called MDP 3.0. It took the data feed providers all of 2020 to sort out how to handle this update and there were some heart stopping moments along the way. In the end it was all a ‘storm in a teacup’. You can read some of the details in these update panels below:

Update May 2020 – CME changes Tick Chart data (again!)

The CME introduced a new data feed protocol in December 2020 and all data feed providers have to implement it by October 2020. So far only CQG/Continuum has switched over but TradeStation has announced they will switch in August 2020 and other data providers will follow suit.

The new data feed appears to revert back to the pre-October 2009 situation (or close to it), with trades “bundled” and allocated to the “aggressor”. The “un-bundled” order details appear to still be available in the raw data feed but this information might be ignored by data feed providers when they disseminate their data. You can read more about the details in this forum thread and this blog post.

The result is that the average Emini trade size has increased by a factor of approx. 3.1 (based on CQG and TradeStation data for Tuesday 26 May 2020). So if you use CQG/Continuum data you might want to change your Emini Tick Charts to: 150, 450 and 1,350 Ticks.

Update December 2020 – MDP 3.0 was a ‘storm in a teacup’

The new CME data feed (MDP 3.0) turned out to be a ‘storm in a teacup’.

The early mover, CQG/Continuum, switched back from bundled to un-bundled data after, what I assume was, trader outcry. All the data providers, except eSignal, seem to have adopted un-bundled data and there appears to be almost no difference between pre- and post-MDP 3.0 data. The average trade size is virtually identical and Better Pro Am continues to identify Professional and Amateur activity.

If you are an eSignal user, we recommend using a 200 Tick bar chart instead of a 500 Tick bar chart, etc. The bundling of data appears to add a factor of 2.5 with Tick Charts. Otherwise, no changes are required to Tick Chart settings. ��

Best Tick Chart for Forex trading

Tick Charts are now possible for trading Forex.

With “traditional” cash Forex charts we only know the number of trades during a period of time and not the number of contracts traded. So on a Tick Chart when we plot volume there is no trade volume size. If you want volume information on a cash Forex chart you’ll have to stick with conventional time-based charts and plot Tick count as a proxy.

However, there is another option – futures Forex contracts traded on the CME. These contracts have grown quickly and are now large enough that they are representative of what happens in the cash Forex market. The advantage of these futures contracts is that complete volume data is available and Tick Charts work great.

There’s more information on using the ‘Better’ series of indicators on Forex charts here.

Tick Charts on different charting platforms

No two Tick data feeds are the same.

This is why you’ll never get 2 Tick Charts using different data feeds to match up exactly. On time-based charts, for example a 5 minute chart, there’s not normally a problem. The data from the exchange is time-stamped and your charting platform uses this to draw the bar.

However, with a Tick Chart, new bars are drawn based on the number of trades that have been completed – and this trade count can be:

  • Filtered by the data feed provider
  • Set to start re-counting at different starting points (e.g. midnight, open, etc.)
  • Aggregated to reduce bandwidth requirements by the data feed provider
  • Missing trades because of momentary Internet disconnects
  • Processed out-of-sequence because of multi-threading on your computer, etc.

Frustrating – I know. But that’s life in the big city. However, for me the advantages of a Tick Chart far outweigh this negative.

Tick Charts and TradeStation

I get a lot of emails from traders asking why their volume indicators don’t look right on a TradeStation Tick Chart. For example, volume histograms that are all the same height. This is easily fixed.

Right click on the chart > select Format Symbol > go to the Settings tab > under For Volume Use you’ll see a pull-down menu > change the setting from Tick Count to Trade Vol. Now the volume indicator on your Tick Chart will reference the trade volume data instead of the Tick count data.

If your Tick Charts are slow to load, your symbol data cache might have been corrupted or become bloated. The solution is to re-build your cache – I do this every 2 to 3 weeks or as soon as I notice my Tick Charts are slow to load. The steps for re-building your cache are explained in Tip #2 here.

Tick Charts and TradingView

TradingView (developed by the makers of MultiCharts) is the future of charting software. What makes it different is that it is 100% web-based – it’s not a stand alone piece of software that has to be coded for Windows or MacOS and installed on your laptop. You just open your web browser and access the TradingView charts and indicators.

However, TradingView is not ready for “professional” trading. Yes, it has great coverage of almost all instruments and exchanges (including all the CryptoCurrencies). But it has two failings. One is that when you re-load a chart from real-time, the data can change. This is almost a fatal flaw.

Secondly, Tick Charts are not yet available on TradingView. This feature has been requested many, many times and TradingView has promised it is in the works. However, as of March 2020, Tick Charts are not available on TradingView.

Tick Charts and Interactive Brokers

The Interactive Brokers (IB) data feed available via their Trader Workstation Software (TWS) is not a true Tick-by-Tick data feed. IB provides snap shots of the trade data several times a second with an aggregate of the trades that took place during that interval. As a result time-based charts (e.g. 5 minute charts) will be correct, however, a Tick Chart constructed using IB data will not.

Summary

This article should have convinced you to use Tick Charts:

  • Professional and Amateur activity can be seen. With a Tick Chart you can judge the average trade size being traded and hence identify the Professionals and Amateurs.
  • The disadvantages of time-based charts are overcome. Tick Charts help you get a jump on breakouts, let you “see” more cyclical information and compress low activity periods.
  • Tick Charts are now possible for Forex trading. Getting complete volume data has always been a problem for Forex. The CME futures contracts for Forex are the answer.
  • Tick Charts will never match between different data providers. This is just a fact of life. It’s not ideal but in no way should dissuade you from using Tick Charts.

I hope you found this article about Tick Charts helpful.

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Winning the contract

Asian options settle by comparing the last tick with the average spot over the period.

If you select “Asian Rise”, you will win the payout if the last tick is higher than the average of the ticks.

If you select “Asian Fall”, you will win the payout if the last tick is lower than the average of the ticks.

If the last tick is equal to the average of the ticks, you don’t win the payout.

Winning the contract

If you select “Matches”, you will win the payout if the last digit of the last tick is the same as your prediction.

If you select “Differs”, you will win the payout if the last digit of the last tick is not the same as your prediction.

Winning the contract

If you select “Ends Between”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly higher than the Low barrier AND strictly lower than the High barrier.

If you select “Ends Outside”, you win the payout if the exit spot is EITHER strictly higher than the High barrier, OR strictly lower than the Low barrier.

If the exit spot is equal to either the Low barrier or the High barrier, you don’t win the payout.

Winning the contract

If you select “Even”, you will win the payout if the last digit of the last tick is an even number (i.e., 2, 4, 6, 8, or 0).

If you select “Odd”, you will win the payout if the last digit of the last tick is an odd number (i.e., 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9).

Winning the contract

If you select “Higher”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly higher than the barrier.

If you select “Higher”, you win the payout if the exit spot is higher than the barrier.

If you select “Lower”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly lower than the barrier.

If the exit spot is equal to the barrier, you only win the payout for “Higher” contracts

If the exit spot is equal to the barrier, you don’t win the payout.

Winning the contract

If you select “Over”, you will win the payout if the last digit of the last tick is greater than your prediction.

If you select “Under”, you will win the payout if the last digit of the last tick is less than your prediction.

Winning the contract

If you select “Higher”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly higher than the entry spot.

If you select “Lower”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly lower than the entry spot.

If you select “Allow equals”, you win the payout if exit spot is higher than or equal to entry spot for “Higher”. Similarly, you win the payout if exit spot is lower than or equal to entry spot for “Lower”.

Winning the contract

You win the payout if the market price ends in the digit you have selected.

Winning the contract

You win the payout if the market price does not end in the digit you have selected.

Winning the contract

If you select “rises”, you win the payout if the market price is higher than the entry spot.

If you select “falls”, you win the payout if the market price is lower than the entry spot.

Winning the contract

If you select “Stays Between”, you win the payout if the market stays between (does not touch) either the High barrier or the Low barrier at any time during the contract period.

If you select “Goes Outside”, you win the payout if the market touches either the High barrier or the Low barrier at any time during the contract period.

Winning the contract

If you select “Rises”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly higher than the entry spot.

If you select “Falls”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly lower than the entry spot.

Winning the contract

If you select “Touches”, you win the payout if the market touches the barrier at any time during the contract period.

If you select “Does Not Touch”, you win the payout if the market never touches the barrier at any time during the contract period.

Winning the contract

If you select “rises”, you win the payout if the market price is higher than the entry spot.

If you select “falls”, you win the payout if the market price is lower than the entry spot.

Pay-out

By purchasing the “Close-Low” contract, you’ll win the multiplier times the difference between the close and low over the duration of the contract.

Pay-out

By purchasing the “High-Close” contract, you’ll win the multiplier times the difference between the high and close over the duration of the contract.

Pay-out

By purchasing the “High-Low” contract, you’ll win the multiplier times the difference between the high and low over the duration of the contract.

Winning the contract

If you select “Reset-Call”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly higher than either the entry spot or the spot at reset time.

If you select “Reset-Put”, you win the payout if the exit spot is strictly lower than either the entry spot or the spot at reset time.

If the exit spot is equal to the barrier or the new barrier (if a reset occurs), you don’t win the payout.

Winning the contract

Call Spread

  • Win maximum payout if the exit spot is higher than or equal to the upper barrier.
  • Win up to maximum payout if exit spot is between lower and upper barrier, in proportion to the difference between exit spot and lower barrier.
  • No payout if exit spot is below or equal to the lower barrier.

Put Spread

  • Win maximum payout if the exit spot is lower than or equal to the lower barrier.
  • Win up to maximum payout if exit spot is between lower and upper barrier, in proportion to the difference between upper barrier and exit spot.
  • No payout if exit spot is above or equal to the upper barrier.

Winning the contract

If you select “High Tick”, you win the payout if the selected tick is the highest among the next five ticks.

If you select “Low Tick”, you win the payout if the selected tick is the lowest among the next five ticks.

Winning the contract

If you select “Only Ups”, you win the payout if consecutive ticks rise successively after the entry spot.
No payout if any tick falls or is equal to any of the previous ticks.

If you select “Only Downs”, you win the payout if consecutive ticks fall successively after the entry spot.
No payout if any tick rises or is equal to any of the previous ticks.

Entry Spot

The entry spot is the first tick after the contract is processed by our servers.

The Average

The average is the average of the ticks, including the entry spot and the last tick.

Entry Spot

The entry spot is the first tick after the contract is processed by our servers.

Exit spot

The exit spot is the latest tick at or before the end time.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time (if less than one day in duration), or at the end of the trading day (if one day or more in duration).

The start time is when the contract is processed by our servers.

Entry Spot

The entry spot is the first tick after the contract is processed by our servers.

Exit spot

The exit spot is the latest tick at or before the end time.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time (if less than one day in duration), or at the end of the trading day (if one day or more in duration).

The remaining time is the time remaining until the contract expires.

The start time is when the contract is processed by our servers.

Entry Spot

The entry spot is the first tick after the contract is processed by our servers.

Entry spot

The start time is when the contract is processed by our servers and the entry spot is the next tick thereafter.
If you select a start time in the future, the start time is that which is selected and the entry spot is the price in effect at that time.

Exit spot

The exit spot is the latest tick at or before the end time.
If you select a start time of “Now”, the end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time (if less than one day in duration), or at the end of the trading day (if one day or more in duration).
If you select a specific end time, the end time is the selected time.

Contract period

The contract period is the period between the next tick after the start time and the end time.

The start time is when the contract is processed by our servers.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time (if less than one day in duration), or at the end of the trading day (if one day or more in duration).

Contract period

The contract period is the period between the next tick after the start time and the end time.

The start time is when the contract is processed by our servers.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time (if less than one day in duration), or at the end of the trading day (if one day or more in duration).

High, Low and Close

The high is the highest point ever reached by the market during the contract period.

The low is the lowest point ever reached by the market during the contract period.

The close is the latest tick at or before the end time. If you selected a specific end time, the end time is the selected time.

Contract period

The contract period is the period between the first tick (after start time) and the end time.

The start time begins when the contract is processed by our servers.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time.

High, Low and Close

The high is the highest point ever reached by the market during the contract period.

The low is the lowest point ever reached by the market during the contract period.

The close is the latest tick at or before the end time. If you selected a specific end time, the end time is the selected time.

Contract period

The contract period is the period between the first tick (after start time) and the end time.

The start time begins when the contract is processed by our servers.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time.

High, Low and Close

The high is the highest point ever reached by the market during the contract period.

The low is the lowest point ever reached by the market during the contract period.

The close is the latest tick at or before the end time. If you selected a specific end time, the end time is the selected time.

Contract period

The contract period is the period between the first tick (after start time) and the end time.

The start time begins when the contract is processed by our servers.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time.

Reset Time

At reset time, if the spot is in the opposite direction of your prediction, the barrier is reset to that spot.

The exit spot is the latest tick at or before the end time.

The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time.

The start time is when the contract is processed by our servers.

The entry spot is the first tick after the contract is processed by our servers.

Entry spot

The start time is when the contract is processed by our servers and the entry spot is the next tick thereafter.

Exit spot

The exit spot is the latest tick at or before the end time.
The end time is the selected number of minutes/hours after the start time (if less than one day in duration), or at the end of the trading day (if one day or more in duration).
If you select a specific end time, the end time is the selected time.

Entry Spot

The entry spot is the first tick after the contract is processed by our servers.

Entry spot

The start time is when the contract has been processed by our servers.

The entry spot is the next tick after the start time.

Exit Spot

The exit spot is the last tick when the contract ends. Contract ends when all ticks rise or fall successively, or when a single tick breaks the predicted pattern.

Contract duration

Please refer to the asset index for each asset’s minimum and maximum contract durations based on trade type.

Contract duration

Please refer to the asset index for each asset’s minimum and maximum contract durations based on trade type.

Contract duration

Please refer to the asset index for each asset’s minimum and maximum contract durations based on trade type.

Contract duration

Please refer to the asset index for each asset’s minimum and maximum contract durations based on trade type.

Note: Asian contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if the contract doesn’t end within 5 minutes.

Note: Digit contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if the contract doesn’t end within 5 minutes.

Note: Ends Between/Ends Outside contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if there are less than 2 ticks between the start and end times.

Note: Even/Odd contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if the contract doesn’t end within 5 minutes.

Note: Higher/Lower contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if there are less than 2 ticks between the start and end times.

Note: Over/Under contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if the contract doesn’t end within 5 minutes.

Note: Rise/Fall contracts will be refunded if:
• There are less than 2 ticks between the start and end times
• The contract doesn’t end within 5 minutes (for tick duration contracts)

Note: Stays Between/Goes Outside Contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if there are less than 2 ticks between the start and end times.

Note: Touch/No Touch contracts will be refunded at the purchase price if there are less than 2 ticks between the start and end times.

Note: High Tick/Low Tick contracts have a strict duration of five ticks.

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The products offered via this website include binary options, contracts for difference (“CFDs”) and other complex derivatives. Trading binary options may not be suitable for everyone. Trading CFDs carries a high level of risk since leverage can work both to your advantage and disadvantage. As a result, the products offered on this website may not be suitable for all investors because of the risk of losing all of your invested capital. You should never invest money that you cannot afford to lose, and never trade with borrowed money. Before trading in the complex products offered, please be sure to understand the risks involved and learn about Responsible Trading.

In the EU, financial products are offered by Binary Investments (Europe) Ltd., W Business Centre, Level 3, Triq Dun Karm, Birkirkara, BKR 9033, Malta, licensed and regulated as a Category 3 Investment Services provider by the Malta Financial Services Authority (licence no. IS/70156).

In the Isle of Man and the UK, Synthetic Indices are offered by Binary (IOM) Ltd., First Floor, Millennium House, Victoria Road, Douglas, IM2 4RW, Isle of Man, British Isles; licensed and regulated respectively by (1) the Gambling Supervision Commission in the Isle of Man (current licence issued on 31 August 2020) and by (2) the Gambling Commission in the UK (licence reference no: 39172).

In the rest of the EU, Synthetic Indices are offered by Binary (Europe) Ltd., W Business Centre, Level 3, Triq Dun Karm, Birkirkara, BKR 9033, Malta; licensed and regulated by (1) the Malta Gaming Authority in Malta (licence no. MGA/B2C/102/2000 issued on 01 August 2020), for UK clients by (2) the UK Gambling Commission (licence reference no: 39495), and for Irish clients by (3) the Revenue Commissioners in Ireland (Remote Bookmaker’s Licence no. 1010285 issued on 1 July 2020). View complete Regulatory Information.

Binary.com is an award-winning online trading provider that helps its clients to trade on financial markets through binary options and CFDs. Trading binary options and CFDs on Synthetic Indices is classified as a gambling activity. Remember that gambling can be addictive – please play responsibly. Learn more about Responsible Trading. Some products are not available in all countries. This website’s services are not made available in certain countries such as the USA, Canada, Hong Kong, or to persons under age 18.

Trading binary options may not be suitable for everyone, so please ensure that you fully understand the risks involved. Your losses can exceed your initial deposit and you do not own or have any interest in the underlying asset.

CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 72% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with Binary Investments (Europe) Ltd. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money.

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